Living in a house with indoor smoking puts

cats, dogs, birds, and other animals at risk.

Learn more about the effects of second and third hand smoke on your pets.

  • cats

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  • Dogs

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  • birds

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  • other animals

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cats

Second Hand Smoke: 

Cats that live in an environment with cigarette smoke have a greater risk of developing asthma and lung cancer.  They are twice as likely to develop lymphoma, a cancer of the lymph nodes that has a low survival rate.  These risks increase the longer the cat lives within the smoky environment. 


Third Hand Smoke:

Cats that groom frequently can develop tumors in their mouth or throat as a result of licking the toxins from third hand smoke off of their fur. 

dogs

Second Hand Smoke:

Different breeds can be affected differently by living in a smoky environment.  Short nosed breeds are more prone to develop lung cancer, while long nose breeds are more prone to develop nasal cancer.  No matter the breed or nose length second hand smoke exposure can increase your dogs risk of cancer.  Dogs can also acquire asthma and respiratory infections from living in smoky environments. 


Third Hand Smoke:

When dogs lick their fur, toys, or other surfaces that were exposed to a smoking environment, they are at risk of ingesting any toxins that have settled there. 


Nicotine Poisoning:

Dogs are also at risk of eating nicotine products, such as cigarettes.  Just two cigarettes ingested by a puppy could be lethal.

birds

Second Hand Smoke:

Airborne toxins and pollutants are especially harmful to the respiratory system of birds.  They are at risk of developing respiratory problems like pneumonia, and lung cancer when they are exposed to second hand smoke. Birds also have a higher risk of skin, heart, eye, and fertility problems when they live in an area exposed to second hand smoke. 


Third Hand Smoke:

As birds preen and clean themselves, they also ingest any tobacco residue that has settled on their feathers.  These birds can also be exposed to residue on their environment, such as toys or food bowls when exposed to a smoking environment. 

Other animals

Second Hand Smoke - Aquatic Animals

When aquariums are in smoky environments, the toxic residue from these tobacco products settle onto the tank and poison the water environment for aquatic animals. Nicotine and ammonia are highly toxic to goldfish and smokers with nicotine on their fingers can unintentionally kill their pets by touching their water. 


Tobacco Poisoning - Wildlife animals

Cigarette butts are one of the most common types of litter collected.  Animals that live with this litter are at risk of ingesting these cigarette butts along with the remaining nicotine and other toxins inside each butt.